'Maggie Vaults Over the Moon'

Use Grit!

RESOURCES ON GRIT, PERSEVERANCE, AND GROWTH MINDSET

GritFist

FROM EDUTOPIA

Can Grit be Taught?

From Teacher Vicki Davis: Here are 11 ways that I’m tackling grit in my classroom and school.

1. Read Books About Grit

Read books, hold book studies and discuss trends. Measuring noncognitive factors like grit will be controversial, but just because we struggle to measure it doesn’t mean that we can stop trying.

2. Talk About Grit

First, I give my students the grit scale test (PDF) and let them score it. Then we watch Angela Duckworth’s TED video together and talk about the decisions we make that impact grit. Empower students to educate themselves — they can’t wait for educators to figure this out.

3. Share Examples

In my ninth grade classroom, January starts with a video about John Foppe, born with no arms, who excelled as an honor student, drove his own car, and became a successful psychologist and speaker while creatively using his feet. We also talk to Westwood alum Scott Rigsby, the first double amputee to complete an Ironman competition. These are gritty people. Life is hard, and luck is an illusion.

4. Help Students Develop a Growth Mindset

Carol Dweck from Stanford University teaches us that students who have a growth mindset are more successful than those who think that intelligence is fixed. (See David Hochheiser’s post Growth Mindset: A Driving Philosophy, Not Just a Tool.)

5. Reframe Problems

Using stories and examples from Malcom Gladwell’s book David and Goliath, we talk about “desirable difficulties.” Students need perspective about problems to prevent them from giving up, quitting or losing hope.

6. Find a Framework

I use Angela Maiers’ Classroom Habitudes as my framework. The KIPP framework specifically includes grit as one of its seven traits. Find one that works for your school and includes clear performance values.

7. Live Grittily

You teach with your life. Perhaps that is why Randy Pausch’s Last Lecture and David Menasche’s Priority List resonate. These teachers used their own battle with death itself as a way to teach. But you don’t have to die to be an effective teacher. Our own work ethic yells so loudly that kids know exactly what we think about grit.

8. Foster Safe Circumstances That Encourage Grit

Never mistake engaging, fun or even interesting for easy. We don’t jump up and down when we tear off a piece of tape because “I did it.” No one celebrates easy, but everyone celebrates championships and winners because those take grit (and more). We need more circumstances to help kids to develop grit before they can “have it.”

Tough academic requirements, sports and outdoor opportunities are all ways to provide opportunities for developing grit. Verena Roberts, Chief Innovation Officer of CANeLearn says:

One of the best ways to learn about grit is to focus on outdoor education and go out into the wild. Grit is about not freaking out, taking a deep breath, and moving on.

9. Help Students Develop Intentional Habits

Read about best practices for creating habits, because habits and self-control require grit.

10. Acknowledge the Sacrifice Grit Requires

Grit takes time, and many students aren’t giving it. In their 2010 paper “The Falling Time Cost of College“, Babcock and Marks demonstrate that, in 1961, U.S. undergraduates studied 24 hours a week outside of class. In 1981, that fell to 20 hours, and in 2003, it was 14 hours per week. This is not to create a blame or generation gap discussion, but rather to point out the cost of being well educated. We are what we do, and if we study less and work less, then we will learn less.

11. Discuss When You Need Grit and When You Need to Quit

Grit is not without controversy. Alfie Kohn has some valid points in his criticism of grit. So read and discuss the opponents of grit in class.

In particular, I agree with the point that there is a time for grit and a time to quit. There are times when it’s OK to quit something that just isn’t within your range of talents, or when trying something different may enrich your life. Worthy tasks deserve persistence. But there are tasks that would be worthier in a different season of your life. There are jobs that should be left. Sometimes you have to let go of something good to grasp something great. Students need discernment to know when they need grit and when it may be a time to quit.

Educators Need Grit

Now we as teachers just need the grit to do whatever it takes to turn education around, and that starts with hard work and our own modern version of true grit. Teaching it and living it is now front and center in the education conversation.

AWESOME NEW GRIT CLASSROOM RESOURCES, ANGELA DUCKWORTH

CHARACTER LAB GRIT RESOURCES

CHARACTER LAB GROWTH MINDSET RESOURCES

CLASSROOM MATERIALS

Building Grit, Cathe McCoy (Teachers Pay Teachers $10)

screenshot-www teacherspayteachers com 2015-08-06 10-37-55Grit and Growth Mindset, Cathe McCoy (Pinterest)

screenshot-www pinterest com 2015-08-06 10-41-29

Unharnessing Students’ Power With Grit, McCoy (Pinterest)

GROWTH MINDSET CLASSROOM MATERIALS

screenshot-www teacherspayteachers com 2015-08-06 10-39-27MATT BROMLEY’S BLOG

BigGrowthMindsetPoster

MINDSETS IN THE CLASSROOM, By MARY CAY RICCI

MindsetsInTheClassroomResourcesCoverSTEAM ELEMENTARY RESOURCES

Vicki Davis, Edutopia article True Grit: The Best Measure of Success and How to Teach It

Additional Educational Resources:

Making Friends With Failure (Edutopia)

Stanford University’s Resilience Project

screenshot-undergrad stanford edu 2015-08-05 12-04-08THE RESILIENCE PROJECT posits that rejection, failure, or disappointment, in the context of learning, are as valuable as the success we strive for. Many of the reflections in these videos and on the pages you’ll read will show you that success comes because of, not in spite of, failure.

Grit and Growth Mindset

In rural New Hampshire, fifth-grade teacher Amy Lyon has created a curriculum based on researcher Angela Duckworth’s ideas about grit. Students set and work toward their own long-term goals, learning valuable lessons about dealing with frustration and distractions along the way.

Edutopia blogger Vicki Davis identifies the nature of grit, its necessity and value of grit in education, and ten ways of teaching students to develop their own grit.

Edutopia blogger Andrew Miller considers ‘grit’ as a 21st century skill encompassing real-world qualities like determination, adaptability and reflection, and suggests five steps to foster this mindset in the classroom.

Gerstein provides educational resources for understanding and building grit in this companion post to her post on resilience, part of a series of posts on 21st-century skills. Her post includes tools for practice at all levels and a link to Angela Duckworth’s TED talk on grit.

  • True Grit (Association for Psychological Science, 2013)

Focused on the research, this article serves as a good overview of Angela Duckworth’s research on grit for beginning and experienced educators.

Blogger Elena Aguilar shares highlights from Paul Tough’s new book, How Children Succeed. As a follow up, you may want to listen to the podcast Back to School (This American Life, 2012), also focused on the Tough book.

MindShift editor Tina Barseghian summarizes some of the highlights of a report issued by the Department of Education’s Office of Technology, “Promoting Grit, Tenacity, and Perseverance—Critical Factors for Success in the 21st Century.”

This outstanding set of articles/podcast explores the challenges faced by disadvantaged students entering college, many of whom struggle to get to graduation. Going beyond grit to the need for ongoing supports, Emily Hanford profiles the support model at work in YES Prep Public Schools, a charter school network Edutopia profiled in 2009: College-Bound Culture in Houston.

Edutopia blogger Jose Vilson offers three strategies to help educators shape the discussion after a student says, “I can’t do this.”

In this article, a useful introduction to Carol S. Dweck’s work and thinking, OneDublin.org founder and editor James Morehead interviews Dweck about her research into mindsets and the concept of “fixed mindset” versus “growth mindset.”

Guest blogger Cindy Bryant, moderator of the LearnBop PLC, describes some of the research on growth mindset and illustrates how the growth mindset aligns with the Common Core Standards for math.

GRIT SCALE .pdf

Grit Includes A Social and Emotional Truth (Part 1)

Grit Includes A Social and Emotional Truth (Part 2)

GRIT WALK LESSON PLAN .pdf

GRIT WALK STUDENT WORKSHEET .pdf

Teaching Students to Embrace Mistakes

25 SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE WHO FAILED AT FIRST

PERSEVERANCE VIDEO COLLECTION (36 VIDEOS ELEMENTARY)

ABOVE AND BEYOND

I’M HERE

BORN TO LEARN

21ST CENTURY EDUCATION

WHAT IS 21ST CENTURY EDUCATION?

TEACHING IN THE 21ST CENTURY

STEAM TO STEM

ARTISTRY AND CREATIVITY IN STEM

MINDSET.COM (Carol Dweck’s Resource-Rich Website)

SCIENCE FAILS

SEVEN WONDERFUL TED TALKS ON LEARNING FROM FAILURE

ANGELA LEE DUCKWORTH TED TALK ON GRIT

GRIT CARTOON

GROWTH MINDSET KID’S VIEW

THE POWER OF ‘YET’ CAROL DWECK

THE MOST FAMOUS FAILED SCIENCE EXPERIMENT

 

 

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